Insane - Unquestioning Heirarchical Auto

Etiquette

If the article is correct, Americans desperately need help in learning how to behave in other countries. There's discussion of distributing an etiquette guide with every new American passport. Here are some of the tips:

  • Think as big as you like but talk and act smaller In many countries, any form of boasting is considered very rude. Talking about wealth, power or status - corporate or personal - can create resentment.
  • Listen at least as much as you talk By all means, talk about America and your life in our country. But also ask people you're visiting about themselves and their way of life.
  • Save the lectures for your kids Whatever your subject of discussion, let it be a discussion not a lecture. Justified or not, the US is seen as imposing its will on the world.
  • Think a little locally Try to find a few topics that are important in the local popular culture. Remember, most people in the world have little or no interest in the World Series or the Super Bowl. What we call "soccer" is football everywhere else. And it's the most popular sport on the planet.
  • Slow down We talk fast, eat fast, move fast, live fast. Many cultures do not.
  • Speak lower and slower A loud voice is often perceived as bragging. A fast talker can be seen as aggressive.
  • Your religion is your religion and not necessarily theirs Religion is usually considered deeply personal, not a subject for public discussions.
  • If you talk politics, talk - don't argue Steer clear of arguments about American politics, even if someone is attacking US politicians or policies. Agree to disagree.

Hand these out to US travelers? Nah, hand 'em out to members of Congress.

Tags:
If you talk politics, talk - don't argue Steer clear of arguments about American politics, even if someone is attacking US politicians or policies. Agree to disagree.

Can we simply just agree?
What makes this seem funny to me is that all of it is just basic manners. I mean most of it you should do anyhow not just when travelling. I don't think that it is just an problem though in the USA I think it is a generational thing in the americas. People seem to be losing thier manners. People have taken the customer is always right thing and have turned it into I am always right. No one is ever at fault for anything, and rudeness is just something that you use to get what you want. Yeah I have an issue with the whole thing.
Americans (and many Canadians) could just use this with each other.
Manners don't matter anymore. No one is allowed to properly discipline their kids, therefore kiids aren't afraid of consequences and many grow into very disrepectful adults who think the rest of us owe them pretty much the world on a platter. The death of common sense and etiquite is a serious blow to everyone. And people wonder why other countries don't seem to like us anymore.
It should be mentioned that there have always been Americans who do have good manners, and that some other countries are just as guilty of this sort of thing. In particular the stereotypical Brit, who thinks they will be understood if they just speak English louder, and who goes abroad only to places that serve english "food" and beer. They could certainly do with an etiquette guide, but how many of these offenders would actually read it?