Mechanical

Appearances Can Be Bad

Unusually for me, I slept late this morning and decided to go out for breakfast at noon. I had a curious pad see ew[1] and went for a walk around Ealing. Heading back to my house, my ears pricked at a conversation in front of me. A couple of young girls, 13? 14?, were complaining, about not learning about America. One asked "why should I care about Italy or Egypt? I want to know about America."

Their conversation quickly turned to what the "U" in EU stood for. As they struggled to remember, I was aghast at such lack of basic knowledge and as I walked past, I almost turned and said "U is for Union".

Then I remembered I had Nabakov's "Lolita" in my hand. I think I'll keep my counsel.

Speaking of which, how could Lolita ever be made into a film? Ignoring the shocking -- no, disturbing -- content of much of the book, the beauty of Lolita is in the word as much as the story. It's certainly not written in the breezy modern style we're accustomed to today. It also has quite a bit of French cohabiting the pages, something which makes it a bit of a closed book for today's audience. I still recommend it, though. It's horrifying, eloquent, beautiful and sad.

Regarding the music I've listed, "Tr(n)igger by Saul Williams", this is from his album The Inevitable Rise and Liberation of Niggy Tardust, produced by Trent Reznor (of Nine Inch Nails fame). It's an incredible album.

(Note: I've heard complaints that some users of Firefox 3 might not hear the sound on embedded videos. Regrettably, I'm one of those users. You'll have to go directly to YouTube to hear it.)



That's two recommendations in one post from me. Check 'em out.

1. Curiously, the pad see ew in the US seems to conform to the original recipe more than any pad see ew I've had in the UK.
  • Current Music: Tr(n)igger | Saul Williams
Re: re
ya? well my sister turns 18 next month and she says curt jr. says hi to his Dad LOL
"Speaking of which, how could Lolita ever be made into a film?"

Didn't like the Kubrick version?
I've never seen a Lolita movie, so I can't say if I'd like them or not. With the beauty of the book's writing, I can't say that I'm particularly curious about the films. On the other hand, the book "Fight Club" for the same reasons seems like it wouldn't lend itself as well to film, but the movie is great. I clearly shouldn't be so quick to judge.